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Tay Bridge Disaster - Commemorated in verse by William McGonnagall

Written by  Rahanna Chambers
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Tay Rail Bridge Tay Rail Bridge William Shand

In 1878 the Tay Rail Bridge connecting Fife and Edinburgh to Dundee was opened.  A joyous moment for everyone no one predicted that just two years later that Britain would have its worst ever railway accident.

In 1880 a train full of passengers leaving Edinburgh reached the Tay Rail Bridge.  Dundee at the time was suffering a fierce storm, causing havoc everywhere.

As the train reached the high girders at the centre of the bridge, they collapsed, plunging the train and its passengers into the icy Tay.

After a public enquiry all eyes were on the creator Sir Thomas Bouch who was blamed for the catastrophe. “For these defects … Sir Thomas Bouch is, in our opinion, mainly to blame. For the faults of design he is entirely responsible.

There were no survivors; there were 60 known victims, but only 46 bodies were recovered, the bridge was replaced in 1887 by William Henry Barlow.

Commemorated in verse by William McGonnagall before the disaster in 1879, the tay bridge disaster was probably one of the writers best poems.

The Tay Bridge Disaster

Beautiful Railway Bridge of the Silv’ry Tay!
Alas! I am very sorry to say
That ninety lives have been taken away
On the last Sabbath day of 1879,
Which will be remember’d for a very long time.

’Twas about seven o’clock at night,
And the wind it blew with all its might,
And the rain came pouring down,
And the dark clods seem’d to frown,
And the Demon of the air seem’d to say --
“I’ll blow down the Bridge of Tay.”

When the train left Edinburgh
The passengers’ hearts were light and felt no sorrow,
But Boreas blew a terrific gale,
Which made their hearts for to quail,
And many of the passengers with fear did say --
“I hope God will send us safe across the Bridge of Tay.”

But when the train came near to Wormit Bay,
Boreas he did loud and angry bray,
And shook the central girders of the Bridge of Tay
On the last Sabbath day of 1879,
Which will be remember’d for a very long time.

So the train sped on with all its might,
And Bonnie Dundee soon hove in sight,
And the passengers’ hearts felt light,
Thinking they would enjoy themselves on the New Year,
With their friends at home they lov’d most dear,
And wish them all a happy New Year.

So the train mov’d slowly along the Bridge of Tay,
Until it was about midway,
Then the central girders with a crash gave way,
And down went the train and passengers into the Tay!
The Storm Fiend did loudly bray,
Because ninety lives had been taken away,
On the last Sabbath day of 1879,
Which will be remember’d for a very long time.

As soon as the catastrophe came to be known
The alarm from mouth to mouth was blown,
And the cry rang out all o’er the town,
Good Heavens! the Tay Bridge is blown down,
And a passenger train from Edinburgh,
Which fill’d all the people’s hearts with sorrow,
And made them for to turn pale,
Because none of the passengers were sav’d to tell the tale
How the disaster happen’d on the last Sabbath day of 1879,
Which will be remember’d for a very long time.

It must have been an awful sight,
To witness in the dusky moonlight,
While the Storm Fiend did laugh, and angry did bray,
Along the Railway Bridge of the Silv’ry Tay,
Oh! ill-fated Bridge of the Silv’ry Tay,
I must now conclude my lay
By telling the world fearlessly without the least dismay,
That your central girders would not have given way,
At least many sensible men do say,
Had they been supported on each side with buttresses,
At least many sensible men confesses,
For the stronger we our houses do build,
The less chance we have of being killed.

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